EPHESUS & ANOTHER DAY AT SEA

NILE BLOG 08

Thursday 11 October, 2012

You might think we’ve seen enough of Really Old Places, but half an hour down the road from Kusadasi (a Mecca for sun worshippers and holiday-makers, and our final port-of-call on Turkey’s western coast) is Ephesus – one of the best-preserved ancient cities in the world. And that’s where we headed yesterday, all bright-eyed and bushy-tailed (after being welcomed ashore by Turkish dancers).

On the way, we detoured up a tree-covered hillside and single-filed through a tiny chapel built on the remains of what’s thought to be the house where Mary, mother of Jesus, spent her final years. (Wait till you hear the fascinating story!) This lovely peaceful site, forgotten for hundreds of years, is now a place of pilgrimage for Christians from all around the world.

As for Ephesus … well, during its prosperous Golden Years, before its ancient harbour finally silted up (the ruins are now 5kms from the sea), it boasted a population of 300,000, and was a major Greek port, with noble houses, marble streets, temples, fountains, sewerage, indoor heating, a library, theatre and (what d’ya know?) even a brothel!  Ephesus was occupied at various times by various conquerors – and the superbly restored site records a long and colourful history.

We Kiwis wandered down the ruin-strewn Arcadian Way … took a zillion photos of a zillion re-erected columns and headless statues  … ogled the stunningly-restored Library of Celsus … and tried our best to imagine what bustling, sophisticated, day-to-day life was like for the Ephesians, some 2000 years ago.

Then those who could sing (or couldn’t – it didn’t matter) climbed up into the partially-restored 35,000-seat Amphitheatre (where St Paul once provoked a riot by challenging local devotion to the many-breasted fertility goddess, Artemis – aka Diana) … and then gathered down on the makeshift stage and sang Pokarekare Ana (to the applause of other tourists)!

Back in Kusadasi, we were treated to a demo of Turkish-carpet-making (from silkworms to glorious hand-loomed rugs) … before browsing the shops and returning to our mother-ship (parked as she was between two much-bigger giant cruisers).

Which brings us to today, as the Prinsendam made its lazy way through the blue-blue waters of the Mediterranean to the western isles of Greece – in flat seas and 29-degree sunshine. It was truly lovely … about as good as it gets … and a welcome break from all this fabulous sightseeing, all this ancient history, all this oohing and aahing and clicking of cameras.

PEOPLE NEWS:

Two more of our little yellow ducks have quacked their way into eager, waiting hands:

  • We’re not sure what Sid was thinking the other day at Iztuzu Beach when he waded out in his shoes and socks, but we suspect he was suffering delusions of grandeur after our boat trip on the Sea of Galilee – and have awarded him the esteemed ‘Walking On Water Award’.
  • Yesterday, for the trip to Ephesus, our group was split into two busloads – and when it came time to leave, Jan was missing. We were about to send out a search party when she sheepishly emerged from the bowels of the other bus – and was promptly nominated for our ‘Stowaway Award’.

TOMORROW:

We’re back in Greece … and the small village of Katakolon is our gateway to the mystical site of ancient Olympia, 40 kilometres to the east – site of the very first Olympic Games. You never know, we might get to sprint (or hobble!) along the famous stadium!

Yours bloggedly – JOHN

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